‘Making Minerals’ is a fun and educational interactive experience that visitors to the Museum can explore on three dedicated touch screens contained in a mineral-inspired thematic centrepiece, designed for accessibility in an inclusive form without diminishing the experience for users.

We produced seven story locations, including volcano, caves and magma chambers, with animations to ‘see’ key steps of the mineral formation process and interactive elements for users to choose from and determine the mineral’s outcome.

Working with POSITURE’s team of healthcare professionals and people with lived experience, we developed gaming apps for handheld devices controlled by gross body movement, rather than standard fine motor thumb controls. Taking the solution one step further, our collaboration with industrial designers produced an optimised ergonomic handset to offer a full digital prescription of positive posture movements.

We made the problem part of the solution to promote positive learned behaviour – without taking away any of the fun!

The inaugural ‘Augmented Revolution’ AR trail featured six artworks across two Adelaide CBD locations throughout the duration of the festival. Each site hosted three physical pillars with QR codes to download the app to iOS and Android devices and unique in-app scannable codes that trigger each artwork with precise positioning based upon ground detection.

While using the app, users could locate and navigate each artwork through an interactive map, capture snapshots and live screen recordings of their device screen, and explore artist bios and artwork synopses of contemporary First Nations artists Carly Tarkari Dodd, Jaydenlee Tong, and Temaana Yundu Sanderson-Bromley, as curated by Dearna Newchurch.

We developed a multi-user interactive touchscreen experience that reflects and reinforces the surrounding gallery themes, showcases a selection from the Museum’s world-leading Pasifika collection of over 60,000 objects and invites visitors to go further into the Museum’s collection and learn more about the sea of islands that make up the Pacific.

The experience is presented as an interactive map where visitors to explore up to 48 Pacific locations from Aotearoa (New Zealand) to West Papua. There are approximately 600 sets of item images and over 2000 individual images of the Museum’s collection items within the interactive, in addition to the display of 300 physical items together with newly commissioned objects by prominent Pacific Island artists and knowledge holders.

With the support of a Green Adelaide Grassroot grant, we developed six unique experiences delivered on digital touchscreen tables, motion detecting projections and iPads that sparks imagination and encourages curiosity whilst empowering their 8,000+ student and community visitors per year to actively protect South Australia’s iconic coastal and marine environments.

Our animated, photo-realistic visualisations of the pre-manufactured STRIX played on screens to the Avalon audience as a 1:1 scale model was unveiled for the first time. The visualisations continued to play on a loop for the remainder of the event and featured across BAE Systems Australia’s collateral that was shared to a worldwide audience.

The reveal was a show stopping highlight that created intrigue, excitement and a lasting impression for attendees from industry, government and defence at the first Avalon Airshow since 2019.

We produced the 3D game ‘DemocraCity’ using Maya and Unity, achieving a compelling and educational interactive experience for deployment on large touchscreens designed for self-directed learning. The game is built as a 3D world full of buildings, unique characters, vehicles and interiors. We developed multiple minigames that feature drag and drop, tabletop and role-playing mechanics to deliver learning through fun as a user’s newfound knowledge is put to the test.

We delivered the 10-minute animated, interactive VR journey as an app available to be downloaded from the store and experienced on a smart phone contained in a fold-out cardboard viewing headset, allowing for easy accessibility and distribution. A brief questionnaire presented before and after the experience asks the user their opinions and knowledge of smoking, providing insight on any knowledge shift and prompting the young person to reflect and bring their new knowledge home.

Working with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service team, we formed a narrative designed to connect to young people with familiar voices and visual images that they respect. Knowledge is shared through progressive stages of the experience on virtual Country by ‘Auntie Julie’, an elder who guides the user throughout the journey, and the people from the community the user engages with, listening as they share their lived experience stories.

Adelaide Christmas Cracker Trail pillars were installed at each location, complete with QR codes to download the app to iOS and Android devices, unique in-app scannable codes, and ground detection and decal alignment technology to take the user through an augmented reality experience based upon the festive event planned at each location.

The user (big or small) can play with pulling digital crackers, popping baubles and enjoying the jokes, facts and games within, utilising face-tracking technology to create fun, bespoke selfies to save and share, and interacting with their surroundings via the phone screen – from decorating Adelaide’s Giant Christmas Tree, posting a Christmas letter at the Town Hall, seeing Santa back on Grote Street, or taking part in a rubber duck race that appears in the Rymill Park pond.

This film offers an unrivalled immersive experience that will leave viewers in no doubt about the devastating effect of climate change. This project fits right in the middle of our lens to produce positive social consciousness projects that entertain, engage and educate audiences. It also ties together our skills in storytelling, interactive, experiential, animation, live-action production and simulation.

Visit the Thin Ice VR website

Major Partner: Torrens University Australia
Financed and developed with the assistance of: South Australian Film Corporation, Screen Australia and Adelaide Film Festival Investment Fund
Supported by: Kathmandu, One Ocean Expeditions and Documentary Australia